Saturday, July 27, 2013

Lost In Translation



As a complete "foodie", I love that I can hop onto the Internet whenever I like, to browse for recipes that suit whatever ingredients I happen to have lying around.  Pinterest is one of my favourite haunts for new recipes; ah, so many pins, so little time!  Being English myself can make following these recipes tricky at times, due to different names and terminology.  So I thought I'd pop in with a teensy little post, that might help with some of us with those "lost in translation" moments...

Baking Ingredient Equivalents

Irish/English = American

Plain flour = All purpose flour
Self-raising flour = Self-rising flour
Bicarbonate of soda = Baking soda
Caster sugar = Superfine sugar
Golden syrup = Light corn syrup
Icing sugar = Confectioners/Powdered sugar
Muscovado sugar = Raw molasses sugar
Egg size UK large = Egg size US extra large
Mixed spice = Apple pie spice
Double cream = Heavy cream
Plain chocolate = Semisweet chocolate
Dark chocolate = Bittersweet chocolate
Treacle = Molasses
Cornflour = Cornstarch
GlacĂ© fruits = Candied fruits
Sultanas = Golden raisins
Dessicated coconut = Dry, unsweetened, shredded coconut


It is also important to note that we Irish (and most Europeans I believe) use Celsius, not Fahrenheit when we cook and bake.  Neglecting to convert the temperature of American recipes, has gotten me into trouble in the kitchen many a time!  Most recently, as I soaked and dried "pepitas"...it was only as we were finishing off those delicious snacks that I realised my mistake!  No wonder they were done super-quick!

Of course some of these were pretty self-explanatory, but some may be a help I hope.  There are also a lot of differences in the names we use for herbs and vegetables.  For instance one of the first American recipes I ever tried out from the internet called for "cilantro" - I had to Google "cilantro" before I could even start!

 Have A GREAT Day In The LORD'S House Tomorrow!


7 comments:

Kerri said...

So interesting, I love things like this. The comparison of English words and American words can be pretty funny!
I am wondering though, what do you call cilantro?

Sarah in Ireland said...

Kerri ~ We call cilantro, coriander. :)

Jessi said...

How funny I didn't know you had different names for those things.

1HappyWife said...

Thank you for a lesson in the kitchen :). I found it very interesting!!!

Elizabeth said...

Treacle and sultanas are the ones that were news to me. We say we speak the same language, but...

:)

It is very interesting.

Loren said...

As I tell my 7 year old: "You learn something new every day!" I had never known cilantro and Coriander were one and the same. I always thought coriander was some exotic spice. (I read a lot of European Lit and they use coriander...I never googled it because of the context they were using it was obvious it was an herb/spice)

Sarah in Ireland said...

Elizabeth ~ I was *totally* thinking of you when I wrote this post, as you and I have certainly had a giggle over my "lost in translation" moments! I'm sure you'll remember the jumper/sweater comment - Haha!

Loren ~ Glad I was able to clear that up! Thanks for stopping by!